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This past Tuesday, advertising executives from Facebook met with journalists to discuss the platform's advertising and how it might change in the future. The conference comes soon after Facebook's marketing made the news-but for very different reasons. It was revealed that the company's video metric measurements for the time users spent watching videos was overestimated by up to 80%. This is because of an error that made it so only video views of three seconds or longer were recorded. The problem has since been corrected, and Facebook's COO Sheryl Sandberg was quick to point out that Facebook uses 14 metrics and only that one was showing incorrect data.

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Millennials as a consumer group are growing. At 75.4 million, they are America’s biggest generation, and marketers were quick to try to get in on these new consumers. Perhaps a little too quickly, however, as many of their original efforts fell flat by using stereotypes in campaigns, like a hipster living in a city.

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In June, Microsoft announced it was purchasing the business social networking site LinkedIn for $26.2 billion. At the time, LinkedIn brought in $881 million and boasted 433 million users at the time of purchase, up from 300 million in 2014. Although the cost was large, many commentators proclaimed that the buy was worth it due to the data LinkedIn has on its members. Microsoft has the ability to integrate that data into a number of their other products, such as Outlook, Skype and Cortana, their version of Siri. It could also be a tool to help Microsoft hold its own as it continues to alter its image from just a software and hardware company to an online business juggernaut.

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When someone says people are losing jobs to robots or automated machines, most envision menial jobs rather than something creative. But technology might be nearing the point where A.I. can fill these creative roles, too.

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A decade ago, branded blogs seemed like the next big thing in marketing. After all, it was a way of presenting more personal stories to audiences and establishing closer connections to consumers. But maintaining an audience who would keep coming back proved difficult, and if the brand had nothing noteworthy to say, it didn't matter how polished their content was.

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Nowadays, who doesn't recognize the cute, loveable emoji faces? But it took them a while to get to where they currently are. In the 90s, emojis first appeared on Japanese phones. It was not until they were included in iPhones, though, that they really became popular worldwide. They are simple ways of lightening a text conversation or conveying a mood, and now they might also become a way of signifying a business.

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“DISPENSE WITH A HORSE.” So said the headline of the first ever automotive advertisement in 1898. It was for the Winton Motor Carriage Company, one of the first American companies to sell automobiles. The ad showed a picture of a man and woman riding in one of the company’s cars, which bears closer resemblance to a horse and buggy minus the horse than a contemporary vehicle. Beside it was a paragraph that outlined the benefits of owning a car, such as it being cheaper and less smelly than a horse. And it was only $1,000 (about $27,500 today).

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As the digital age progresses and marketing continues to evolve, new terms and buzzwords pop up. "Content advertising" is one such term and has a bit of confusion surrounding it. It is not content marketing, nor is it native advertising. It is instead making content and then promoting it by using paid distribution channels. Both pay-per-click (PPC) campaigns and sponsored ads fall under this umbrella. Any kind of content is okay; if it is promoted through paid channels, then it counts as content advertising.

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Right now, the Olympics are happening in Rio, Brazil, and from impressive videos to memes, social media is running wild with it. Most business pages, though, cannot take part in the fun. That's because any non-sponsor brands are prohibited by the U.S. Olympic Committee from using a variety of trademarks or phrases during the games. These include "Olympic," "Team USA," "Tokyo 2020," words that use part of "Olympic," like Mathlympics, and posting results. Sharing or retweeting something with a banned word in it is also prohibited.

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Earlier this week it was announced that Verizon had bought Yahoo for about $4.83 billion. The deal is expected to be closed in the first quarter of next year. Last year Verizon acquired AOL. Owning these two platforms could turn Verizon into a force in global mobile media, competing for ad money with even Google and Facebook.

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