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Could Sponsored Emojis Be the Next Big Thing?
Could Sponsored Emojis Be the Next Big Thing?

Nowadays, who doesn't recognize the cute, loveable emoji faces? But it took them a while to get to where they currently are. In the 90s, emojis first appeared on Japanese phones. It was not until they were included in iPhones, though, that they really became popular worldwide. They are simple ways of lightening a text conversation or conveying a mood, and now they might also become a way of signifying a business. 

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A Brief History of Automotive Advertising
A Brief History of Automotive Advertising

“DISPENSE WITH A HORSE.” So said the headline of the first ever automotive advertisement in 1898. It was for the Winton Motor Carriage Company, one of the first American companies to sell automobiles. The ad showed a picture of a man and woman riding in one of the company’s cars, which bears closer resemblance to a horse and buggy minus the horse than a contemporary vehicle. Beside it was a paragraph that outlined the benefits of owning a car, such as it being cheaper and less smelly than a horse. And it was only $1,000 (about $27,500 today). 

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The Olympic Social Media Blackout (and how Brands Work Around It)
The Olympic Social Media Blackout (and how Brands Work Around It)

Right now, the Olympics are happening in Rio, Brazil, and from impressive videos to memes, social media is running wild with it. Most business pages, though, cannot take part in the fun. That's because any non-sponsor brands are prohibited by the U.S. Olympic Committee from using a variety of trademarks or phrases during the games. These include "Olympic," "Team USA," "Tokyo 2020," words that use part of "Olympic," like Mathlympics, and posting results. Sharing or retweeting something with a banned word in it is also prohibited. 

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What Exactly is Content Advertising?
What Exactly is Content Advertising?

As the digital age progresses and marketing continues to evolve, new terms and buzzwords pop up. "Content advertising" is one such term and has a bit of confusion surrounding it. It is not content marketing, nor is it native advertising. It is instead making content and then promoting it by using paid distribution channels. Both pay-per-click (PPC) campaigns and sponsored ads fall under this umbrella. Any kind of content is okay; if it is promoted through paid channels, then it counts as content advertising.

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